tsunami monument

13 Best About Tsunami Monument Kuala Muda Kedah

Tsunami monument Kuala Muda in kedah

The Tsunami Monument Kuala Muda Kedah

tsunami monument kuala muda kedah
The Tsunami Monument was built to commemorate the tsunami tragedy which hit Kuala Muda Kedah on December 26th, 2004
mpspk.gov.my
The Tsunami Monument

The Tsunami Monument was built to commemorate the tsunami tragedy which hit Kuala Muda Kedah on December 26th, 2004. This monument was built using the 26 fishermen damaged boats from that tragedy, which reflects the date of December 26th and it was built in such a way as during the tragedy of fishing boats overlap between each other.

Next to this monument, there is a fenced area that houses were destroyed due to huge waves during the tsunami struck this village. Most of the houses in the coastal namely Kampung Sungai Muda and Kampung Tepi Sungai were destroyed. Now the empty houses has become the tsunami memorial for the visitors.

– Tsunami Monument Kuala Muda Kedah

Tsunami Monument Kuala Muda Kedah - A Memory​

tsunami monument
Tsunami Monument Kuala Muda Kedah - Ten years ago today, a “big wave” triggered by a massive underwater earthquake off Aceh in Indonesia struck the western coast of Penang island and Kedah, claiming the lives of 68 Malaysians from among 220,000 worldwide.
tsunami monument
malaymail.com
news/malaysia/2014/12/26/a-decade-on-big-wave-still-haunts-seaside-dwellers-to-malaysias-north/808431

Tsunami Monument : GEORGE TOWN, Dec 26 ― Ten years ago today, a “big wave” triggered by a massive underwater earthquake off Aceh in Indonesia struck the western coast of Penang island and Kedah, claiming the lives of 68 Malaysians from among 220,000 worldwide.

The local death toll may seem small compared to the losses suffered on the global scale, but the widespread devastation of home and loved ones demonstrated by this force of nature is now deeply etched into the minds of those who survived the Boxing Day 2004 tsunami.

Just a few months back, someone told us there was a strong earthquake in Indonesia, in a town quite near us, so all of us immediately grabbed our valuables and made a run for it to the hinterland far from the sea,” said Abdul Majid Kassim, one of the villagers in Kota Kuala Muda, Kedah, whose life was forever changed by the “big wave”.

The fisherman claimed the villagers had carried out their own evacuation even though there was no official warning or confirmation of a possible tsunami threat.“It is not something we forget easily, so all of us are still quite traumatize and every time we hear that there’s a strong earthquake and possible tsunami, we will immediately leave, it is better to be safe,” he said.

Tsunami Monument The passage of those 10 years have not eased the nervousness of the remaining residents of this quiet coastal village upon hearing or seeing the word tsunami or earthquake; they remain ever watchful for the signs of these two natural disasters.Abdul Majid, 60, recalled the day the tsunami came to the quiet fishing village of Kota Kuala Muda like it had just happened.

There were two kenduris held at the houses located closer to the beach and the people there were making merry, when the “big waves”, as the locals called it in Malay, rolled in just after the clock struck 1pm.

“When the first wave hit, many of the villagers could barely make a run for it because it was fast and sudden, so some just held on to whatever they could,” he said.After the first wave receded, the villagers immediately ran as far inland as they could; some even climbed up on to the roofs of sturdier houses and the second storey of one of the village houses, Abdul Majid said.

Tsunami Monument Tombawan Khamis, 75, survived the giant waves that rolled over Kota Kuala Muda. Not so, her elderly mother who was killed by the force of the first wave.She remembers the family desperately carrying her mother’s lifeless body to the upper floor of a neighbour’s house where they had sought shelter just scant minutes before a second giant wave battered the village.

“We couldn’t just leave her body there, so everyone helped us to carry her body and took her with us,” the frail housewife told Malay Mail Online.A total 11 villagers died that day. More than 100 houses were damaged or destroyed.Kota Kuala Muda, consisting mainly of fishermen, had been a village of over 160 village houses before the tsunami.

Today Tsunami Monument, only 60 of the original houses still stand, and the majority of the villagers have since relocated further inland to a new housing area built to replace their smashed dwelling.

Those who live in the 60 houses along the shoreline do so not because they want to; according to Abdul Majid, they were not given new homes as their dwellings were only slightly damaged by the waters and they cannot afford to buy new buildings.

“We have nowhere to go so we continue to stay here despite the fear lingering on,” he said.Today, a monument of wooden boats stacked on top of each other stand at the centre of the village as a reminder and to commemorate those who were lost on that day.

Nearby, a row of derelict houses stand behind a brand new wire fence that mark the compound of the Tsunami Museum, set up by the Kedah government.A total 68 people died in Malaysia as a result of the 2004 tsunami; most of the victims were killed on Penang’s popular beaches touted as picnic hotspots covering Batu Ferringhi to the north and the island state’s entire western flank.

Tsunami Monument Till today, Chew said he has the jitters when thinks of his narrow escape from death 10 years ago. He is now extra mindful when he ventures out to sea.“Our village was also affected by the water, but we are lucky that we were spared from worse impact as we have a mangrove swamp that had softened the waves from directly hitting us,” the fisherman said.

Batu Ferringhi trader Mizi Yahya remembers how the popular tourist belt was deserted for months after the tsunami, in particular a stretch named Miami Beach where many were swept out to sea.The seaside visitors, most of them from outstation, have since returned; but Mizi said he and other traders can never forget witnessing the sight of the killer waves.

“Previously, we have never heard of tsunami. On that day, all we knew was that these are big strong waves. But today, everyone knows what is a tsunami and that it is not something anyone who has seen it and survived can ever forget,” he told Malay Mail Online.

At the coastal village of Pulau Betong on Penang’s Balik Pulau, a fisherman remembers sitting on the shore mending his nets when his friends alerted him to the strange wave rushing towards them.“I acted on reflex to quickly jump up onto land and ran inside just as the wave came splashing in; all the moored boats flew upriver as if [struck] by an invisible force ,” said the man who wished only to be known as Chew.

Tsunami Monument Till today, Chew said he has the jitters when thinks of his narrow escape from death 10 years ago. He is now extra mindful when he ventures out to sea.“Our village was also affected by the water, but we are lucky that we were spared from worse impact as we have a mangrove swamp that had softened the waves from directly hitting us,” the fisherman said.

Batu Ferringhi trader Mizi Yahya remembers how the popular tourist belt was deserted for months after the tsunami, in particular a stretch named Miami Beach where many were swept out to sea.The seaside visitors, most of them from outstation, have since returned; but Mizi said he and other traders can never forget witnessing the sight of the killer waves.

“Previously, we have never heard of tsunami. On that day, all we knew was that these are big strong waves. But today, everyone knows what is a tsunami and that it is not something anyone who has seen it and survived can ever forget,” he told Malay Mail Online. Tsunami Monument

 

The Tsunami Monument Kuala Muda Kedah

tsunami monument
The Tsunami Monument was built to commemorate the tsunami tragedy which hit Kuala Muda Kedah on December 26th, 2004
tsunami monument
nst.com.my
lifestyle/jom/2019/08/508926/jom-go-emerald-rivers-oysters-and-archaeology

Tsunami Monument A trip to Kedah opens Loong Wai Ting’s eyes to the rebirth of enterprise after the tsunami of 2004, and the historical Bujang Valley.“WHAT, we’re visiting an oyster farm in Kedah?” I ask my tour leader AJ, a genial and chatty fellow whose knowledge of Kedah is so extensive that we call him a walking Wikipedia.Grinning from ear to ear, AJ winks at me before ushering me onto his “catamaran” (it’s just a small boat, really) at the Semeling Jetty in the quiet town of Merbok in Sungai Petani, Kedah.

Tsunami Monument : Part of me is sceptical about his “claim” but I’m curious to see the farm for myself. The small-ish farm known as Bakau Hijau is located by the riverbank of Sungai Batu Besi in Sungai Merbok, a 45km-long river that separates Sungai Petani on the south and Yan on the north.Together with the rest of the media entourage and representatives from the Tourism Malaysia office, we are all set to explore this northern state of Peninsular Malaysia known for its rolling hills and greenery as well as its vast paddy fields.

Our 4D/3N, which is under the Expresi Media Lembah Bujang, takes us through numerous important locations along the Bujang Valley such as the historical site of Sungai Batu, where evidence of early human settlements can be found; the Candi Batu Pahat, an important ritual spot in ancient times; and an eye-opening stay at the Kampung Raga Homestay.

Although it has been 15 years since the devastating 2004 tsunami, Pak Ismail, who was 58 years old at that time, is still able to recall the scene with clarity. He was at a kenduri (feast) with his family when the waves hit.“There was madness everywhere. People were screaming, the houses, the fishing boats and everything in its path were destroyed in the blink of an eye. Even after all these years, I can still remember what happened and realise how lucky I am,” he says, with sorrow in his voice.

Tsunami Monument : The first wave, measuring about 2.5 metres high, smashed into Kuala Muda beach at 1.15pm. Dumbfounded, the villagers just stood and watched. The second wave, which measured about 8m high, wiped off the entire village, damaging more than 400 homes in its wake.

Families from a total of 477 houses had to be evacuated. Eleven people in Kedah lost their lives; nine of those were from Kota Kuala Muda.Pak Ismail was one of the few lucky ones to walk away unscathed.

As I walk along the shoreline, I try to imagine that fateful day and how people, who were enjoying themselves one minute, were gone the next. I come across the Kota Kuala Muda Tsunami Memorial, which was erected soon after the incident in memory of those who had lost their lives.The memorial is a museum of sorts; it sits next to a row of damaged houses which serve as a reminder of that incident. Known as Galeri Tsunami, the memorial which is located in a single-storey house, is packed with information about the tsunami and photos taken around the villages.

Tsunami Monument : Some of the photos are very disturbing and sends chills down my spine. Leaving the Galeri Tsunami behind, I walk among the ruined houses that once provided shelter for families. Remnants of the destruction can still be seen — the toppled walls, cracked tiles. Choosing a clean spot, I sit down on the floor and close my eyes for a second. It’s hard to imagine what the villagers would have gone through.

Like the rest of the surviving villagers here, Pak Ismail has since rebuilt his life. “It’s hard to let go but we need to continue living. Every day we take one step at a time,” he says.With a nudge, he invites me to walk with him to a nearby warung, famed for its lip-smacking mee udang. It’s comfort food you shouldn’t miss whenever you are in Kota Kuala Muda.

– Tsunami Monument Kuala Muda Kedah.

Tsunami Monument : Don’t go home without trying the delicious mee udang in front of the Galeri Tsunami

mee udang
Tsunami Monument : The warung faces the sea. In the far left corner is Tanjung Bungah in Penang
nst.com.my
lifestyle/jom/2019/08/508926/jom-go-emerald-rivers-oysters-and-archaeology

Tsunami Monument Kuala Mudah Kedah : With a nudge, he invites me to walk with him to a nearby warung, famed for its lip-smacking mee udang. It’s comfort food you shouldn’t miss whenever you are in Kota Kuala Muda.

The warung faces the sea. In the far left corner is Tanjung Bungah in Penang, a long stretch of sandy beach popular among holidaymakers. Within minutes of sitting down, a worker comes over to take our order. Service is prompt and our order arrives in less than 10 minutes. A popular dish during tea in the northern state, this Malay-style prawn noodle is sweet with a spicy reddish-brown broth.

The soup is bursting with flavour. It has a pleasant prawn taste, and is thickened with cornstarch. Freshly-cut chilli is sprinkled on top of the huge prawns, yielding a slightly sweet taste. There are also chopped coriander, fried shallots and a slice of lime to enhance the flavour.As I take pictures of my mee udang, Pak Ismail wolfs down his meal.

By the time I am ready to tuck into the delicious meal, he is ready to leave. After bidding each other goodbye, I return to my table to enjoy my humble plate of mee udang while enjoying the lull of the ocean.

– Tsunami Monument

Contact

Tsunami Monument : Sampan Tsunami Kuala Muda 2004, Kampung Kepala Jalan, 08500 Kota Kuala Muda, Kedah, Malaysia

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