11 Best Johor National Parks - Gunung Ledang, Endau Rompin

It's Time to Start Your Adventures - 11 Best Johor National Parks - Gunung Ledang, Endau Rompin

11 Best Johor National Parks – Gunung Ledang, Endau Rompin Peta, Endau Rompin Selai, Taman Laut Sultan Iskandar, Pulau Kukup, Ramsa Sites and Tanjung Piai. You also will discover Ramsa Sites in Johor and Ramsa Sites in Malaysia. Johor National Parks for you to explore

11 Best Johor National Parks - Endau Rompin Peta

Johor National Parks – Gunung Ledang, Endau Rompin Peta. Established in 1993, the 48,905-ha Endau-Rompin (Johor) National Park is the largest protected area in the southern half of Peninsular Malaysia.

This ancient rainforest realm in north-eastern Johor is a treasure trove of biodiversity, and a critical habitat so important for the survival of the country’s globally-threatened megafauna, including the Malayan Tiger, Malayan Tapir and Asian Elephant.

There are two official entry points to the Johor National Parks: the Peta entrance located along the eastern boundary in the district of Mersing, and the Selai entrance at the southwestern boundary in the district of Segamat.

The Johor National Parks Peta entrance provides a gateway to the rugged wilderness of the upper Endau valley, where pristine rivers and raging waterfalls are the star attractions.

A visit to Johor National Parks Peta is also a cultural experience, as the Endau valley lies within the customary lands of the indigenous people of Kampung Peta, whose lives are intertwined with the forest in profound and inexplicable ways. Through the eyes and hearts of the Jakun, this timeless land is filled with oral history; populated by unseen beings; and alive with the hidden messages of benevolent animals.

Top 5 Johor National Parks Peta highlights:

  • Upeh Guling – Soak up the scenery at one of the most beautiful waterfalls in the country.
  • Buaya Sangkut – Endure the challenging trek to the foot of this majestic falls.
  • Janing Barat – Feel the other-worldly vibes of the fan palm forest.
  • Tasik Biru – Swim with the fishes in the translucent waters of the blue lake.
  • Kampung Peta – Experience authentic Orang Hulu culture and hospitality.

Johor National Parks – Gunung Ledang, Endau Rompin. Established in 1993, the 48,905-ha Endau-Rompin (Johor) National Park is the largest protected area in the southern half of Peninsular Malaysia.

This ancient rainforest realm in north-eastern Johor is a treasure trove of biodiversity, and a critical habitat so important for the survival of the country’s globally-threatened megafauna, including the Malayan Tiger, Malayan Tapir and Asian Elephant.

There are two official entry points to the park: the Peta entrance located along the eastern boundary in the district of Mersing, and the Johor National Parks Selai entrance at the southwestern boundary in the district of Segamat.

The Johor National Parks Selai entrance is named after the main river that flows through this park of the park. A local Orang Asli legend has it that long ago a celestial princess who possessed great body heat descended upon the earth.

The scorching heat that emanated from her body caused the great river that flowed down from the mountains of Gunung Besar to be reduced to a mere trickle the size of a strip of rattan or in the local language, sehelai rotan (or “Selai” for short).

Smaller than the Johor National Parks Endau and Jasin rivers at the park’s eastern entrance, the Selai river exudes a tranquil quality, with exquisite Pelawan trees that lean over the water’s edge, their foliage dappling sunlight onto stony islets encircled by aquatic life.

The local word for “waterfall” is takah, and Selai is indeed takah country. Some of its finest waterfalls are open to visitors; these form the focal points of pleasant, if not mildly challenging, day treks through the rainforest.

Top 5 Johor National Parks Selai highlights:

  • Takah Tinggi – Feel the force while standing at the foot of this massive waterfall.
  • Tubing Sungai Selai – Use your strength and wits to conquer the rapids by tyre tube and paddle.
  • Takah Pandan – Savour the fragile beauty of the falls and the unique plants that adorn it.
  • Forest trails – Be captivated by all the little things that you spot along the trail, both in the daytime and at night.
tanjung piai

Johor National Parks - Tanjung Piai

Johor National Parks – Tanjung Piai. From a geographical perspective, Johor National Parks Tanjung Piai (lit. Cape of the Golden Leather Fern) occupies a very special corner of the world.

At a latitude of 1°16.00’ North, the cape constitutes the southernmost point of mainland Asia, or to be more precise, continental Eurasia. It is also one of the few places where two neighbouring countries (Singapore and Indonesia) can be seen simultaneously.

Tanjung Piai Johor National Park was established in 1997 to protect this unique site; in particular, the intertidal mangroves and mudflats that line the cape along with the important ecosystem services that they provide. In 2003, Tanjung Piai Johor National Park was recognised by the Ramsar Convention as a Ramsar Site, or Wetlands of International Importance.

Since the park’s inception, it has been an ongoing battle by all involved to protect its mangrove forest which has faced serious erosion issues due to strong waves generated by thousands of tankers that sail past each year, as well as the occasional pollution events from oil spills and illegal dumping of ballast water.

With the installation of offshore breakwaters, coupled with intensive mangrove replanting, the tide has now turned, and many areas that were previously eroded have now been re-colonised by healthy mangroves, and the park is now in better condition that it has ever been.

Spanning 325 ha, Johor National Parks Tanjung Piai is the smallest but most visited amongst Johor’s five national parks. It’s certainly a great place to spend a day, observe the biodiversity, take in the views and marvel at the intricate relationship between man and nature.

The park has ample facilities for visitors which include a 1.2 km network of boardwalks, a visitor complex that houses an information gallery, as well as a unique elevated campsite within the mangroves.

pulau kukup

Johor National Parks - Pulau Kukup

Johor National Parks – Pulau Kukup. Pulau Kukup (Johor) National Park was established in 1997 to protect one of the largest mangrove islands in the world.

This unique island that spans 647 ha is an important refuge for many mangrove-associated plants and animals; a number of which are considered to be rare or threatened species. The park’s boardwalks, viewing platforms and informative signage make it the perfect place to observe and uncover the web of life within this unique interface between land and sea.

The park is an important stopover site for migratory waterbirds undertaking the perilous journey along the East Asian – Australasian Flyway (EAAF). The 807 ha of mudflats that surround the park are productive feeding grounds for these birds during low tide, whereas the mangroves provide a safe place for them to roost.

The park is also important for the local human population living on the Kukup mainland. Its mangroves are a fish nursery that supports the local fishing industry, whereas its mudflats are rich with shellfish that provide a source of food and income.

Overlooking the Straits of Melaka, one of the busiest shipping routes in the world, the island shields the coastal villages from the full force of wind and waves. In January 2003, the park was designated by the Ramsar Convention as a Wetland of International Importance, or Ramsar Site.

Like many other small islands in the region, Pulau Kukup has its fair share of myths and legends. Among them is the tale of the goblin princesses; one of whom fell in love with a sailor, with grave consequences.

Another story tells of a giant snake that protects the island and occasionally swims across the straits, over to Pulau Karimun in Indonesia. In the olden days, Pulau Kukup notorious as being a pirate’s den.

According to one (unverified) source, the island’s name stems from the Malay word ‘gugup’ (lit. “nerve-wrecking”), which is what seafarers of yore might have felt when they sailed past this island, en route to the Straits of Melaka.

gunung ledang

Johor National Park - Gunung Ledang

Gunung Ledang Johor National Park was established in 2005 to protect this special mountain, along with all of the unique plants and animals that call it home. The 8,611.9-ha protected area, which spans the entire Ledang massif, holds an expanse of pristine tropical rainforest and serves as a critical water catchment area for both Johor and Melaka.

Gunung Ledang is also steeped in legend. Many of the legends are centered around the mythical princess, Puteri Gunung Ledang. In the most famous version chronicled in Sejarah Melayu (Sulalatus Salatin / The Malay Annals), the princess spurns the advances of the Sultan of Melaka by setting seven impossible demands for her hand in marriage.

The mountain goes by several names. Chinese sailors plying the Straits of Melaka in the 14th century called it Kim Sua, which literally means “gold mountain” in Hokkien. Also alluding to the gold deposits rumoured to be present on the mountain, British cartographers named it Mount Ophir, after the lost mines of Ophir that supplied King Solomon‘s treasure.

The name “Gunung Ledang” is likely to have been coined during the reign of the Majapahit empire. In Old Javanese, “Ledang” may be translated as “high”, “faraway”, or “showy”.

While gold has never been found on Gunung Ledang, it is undoubtedly a treasure trove of biodiversity and an increasingly important refuge for wildlife. Not surprisingly, the mountain has been explored by top naturalists and scientists since the 1800s.

Alfred Russel Wallace spent a week here collecting birds and insects in 1854, whereas H.N. Ridley wrote an account of the flora of Mount Ophir in a 1901 issue of the Journal of the Straits Branch of the Royal Asiatic Society.

Gunung Ledang, Today

Today, Johor National Park Gunung Ledang is one of the most popular mountain climbing destinations in the country – between 15,000 and 20,000 visitors attempt to scale the 1,276 meter-high mountain each year.

While the summit can be reached in half a day, it is not any easy climb by any means. Those who manage to reach the top are rewarded with a spectacular 360-degree view of the surrounding plains, weather permitting.

The main entrance to the park, which is also known as Taman Hutan Lagenda, is situated at the southern foot of the mountain, near the town of Sagil in Tangkak district. While most visitors come here to climb the mountain, the park entrance itself is a great place for less strenuous activities such as a picnic or camping trip by the river.

It’s a particularly suitable destination for families, school or company groups. There is a range of accommodation available, including chalets, dormitories, jungle huts and campsites; whereas there a number of group packages are on offer, with fun activities such as obstacle course, paintball and nature walks.

Taman Laut Sultan Iskandar

Johor National Park - Taman Laut Sultan Iskandar, Johor

Johor National Park – Taman Laut Sultan Iskandar, Johor. Located off the southeastern coast of Peninsular Malaysia, the islands of the Seribuat archipelago boast some of the most beautiful sandy beaches and clearest waters in the country.

The islands of the archipelago located in Johor’s waters are protected within the Sultan Iskandar Marine Park. Located off the coast of Mersing, the park includes 41 islands grouped within five main clusters; namely Pulau Tinggi, Pulau Sibu, Pulau Besar, Pulau Aur and Pulau Pemanggil.

Just a short boat ride from the mainland, the larger islands are inhabited by local Malay traditional fishing communities, who have been here since the days of old when vicious pirates roamed the seas. The pirates have long been eradicated, whereas the islands now boast a variety of guest houses and beach resorts that will suit the requirements of local and foreign visitors alike.

Taman Laut Sultan Iskandar, Johor Part II

Johor National Park Taman Laut Sultan Iskandar. While lounging on the beaches, swimming in the crystal-clear waters and partaking in slightly more strenuous water sport activities are the main draw, beneath the waves lie healthy coral reefs with a myriad of lifeforms to be explored, whereas deep sea fishing trips beckon the intrepid angler.

Ecologically speaking, these islands hold a unique assemblage of flora and fauna that includes native, endemic as well as rare or globally-threatened species – both on land as well as underwater. Making up part of the Mersing Geopark, the islands also possess a unique geological heritage. 248-million-year-old volcanic rock formations may be seen at certain spots, such as on the southeastern part of Pulau Sibu.

ramsar site

Johor National Parks - Ramsar Sites

THE RAMSAR CONVENTION – NATIONAL PARK

Adopted in the Iranian city of Ramsar in 1971, the Convention on Wetlands of International Importance, otherwise known as the Ramsar Convention provides the global framework international cooperation on wetland issues.

As of October 2018, a total of 170 countries from around the world have become Contracting Parties to the Convention. The Convention’s mission is “the conservation and wise use of all wetlands through local and national actions and international cooperation, as a contribution towards achieving sustainable development throughout the world”.

The concept of “wise use”, which is defined as “the maintenance of the ecological character of wetlands, through the implementation of ecosystem approaches, within the context of sustainable development” lies at the heart of the Convention.

The concept alludes to the conservation and sustainable use of wetlands and all the services that they provide, for the benefit of both people and nature. Contracting Parties are committed towards the wise use of wetlands in their respective territories via national policies, legislation, site management and public education.

Contracting Parties are encouraged to nominate wetland sites to be included on the List of Wetlands of International Importance, otherwise known as the Ramsar List. The nominated sites are assessed based on a set of criteria in order to determine whether they are of “international importance”.

The inclusion of a site on the Ramsar List reflects a government’s commitment to ensure that its ecological character, functions and values are maintained for the benefit of future generations. As of October 2018, there are 2,306 Ramsar sites worldwide, which cover a combined area over 2.1 million square kilometers.

 


ramsar sites

Ramsar Sites in Malaysia

RAMSAR IN MALAYSIA – NATIONAL PARK

Malaysia became a Contracting Party to the Ramsar Convention on the 10th of March 1995. Since then, a number of policies, plans, programmes and projects have been initiated by the Government of Malaysia and NGOs, towards the conservation and wise use of its wetlands.

The Ministry of Water, Land and Natural Resources (KATS) serves as the National Focal Point for the Ramsar Convention in Malaysia.

To date, seven wetlands in Malaysia have been designated as Ramsar sites:

  • Tasik Bera, Pahang (38,446 ha)
  • Tanjung Piai, Johor (526 ha)
  • Pulau Kukup, Johor (647 ha)
  • Sungai Pulai, Johor (9,126 ha)
  • Kuching Wetlands, Sarawak (6,610 ha)
  • Lower Kinabatangan-Segama, Sabah (78,803 ha)
  • Kota Kinabalu Wetlands, Sabah (4.2 ha)

RAMSAR SITES IN JOHOR

Ramsar Sites in Johor : Johor is the custodian of three out of the seven Ramsar sites in Malaysia. The high proportion of Ramsar sites in Johor is a clear indication of the State’s rich natural heritage.

Two of these Ramsar sites, Pulau Kukup Ramsar Site and Tanjung Piai Ramsar are managed by Johor National Parks Corporation (JNPC), whereas the Sungai Pulai Ramsar Site is managed by the Johor Forestry Department. Updated management plans have been prepared for all three sites.

Johor National Parks Corporation (JNPC) has been conducting Communication, Education, Participation and Awareness (CEPA) programmes at Pulau Kukup and Tanjung Piai since 2003. The main objective of these programmes is to raise public awareness on wetlands; in particular, amongst school, college and university students. Feedback from the programmes have been positive, they are in demand by schools and other groups throughout the year.

Ramsar site number: 1287
Ramsar site area: 647 ha
Ramsar site designation date: 31-01-2003
Legal designation:
1) Pulau Kukup Forest Reserve
2) Pulau Kukup (Johor) National Park

Justification for Ramsar site listing:

Criterion 1:
Contains a representative, rare, or unique example of a natural or near-natural wetland type found within the appropriate biogeographic region.

Criterion 2:
Supports vulnerable, endangered, or critically endangered species or threatened ecological communities.

Criterion 3:
Supports populations of plant and/or animal species important for maintaining the biological diversity of a particular biogeographic region.

Site summary
Pulau Kukup Ramsar Site Johor National Park encompasses an uninhabited mangrove island; one of the few intact islands of its kind left on Earth. Apart from supporting a number of globally threatened species, Pulau Kukup is important for flood control, physical protection and shoreline stabilization, as it shelters the mainland town from storm events.

The narrow straits between Pulau Kukup Johor National Park and the mainland support a thriving industry of marine cage culture, whereas the surrounding mudflats are rich with shellfish that provide a source of food and income for locals. The tourism industry at Kukup town is flourishing, with Pulau Kukup being one of the main attractions. The site is well established for tourism and CEPA. Facilities include a visitor centre, boardwalks and platforms with interpretive signage, as well as a gallery at the park office.

Ramsar site number: 1288
Ramsar site area: 9,126 ha
Ramsar site designation date: 31-01-2003
Legal designation: Sungai Pulai Forest Reserve

Justification for Ramsar site listing:

Criterion 1:
Contains a representative, rare, or unique example of a natural or near-natural wetland type found within the appropriate biogeographic region.

Criterion 2:
Supports vulnerable, endangered, or critically endangered species or threatened ecological communities.

Criterion 3:
Supports populations of plant and/or animal species important for maintaining the biological diversity of a particular biogeographic region.

Criterion 7:
Supports a significant proportion of indigenous fish subspecies, species or families, life-history stages, species interactions and/or populations that are representative of wetland benefits and/or values and thereby contributes to global biological diversity.

Criterion 8:
Important source of food for fishes, spawning ground, nursery and/or migration path on which fish stocks, either within the wetland or elsewhere, depend.

Site summary
Sungai Pulai Ramsar Site encompasses the largest riverine mangrove system in Johor. With associated seagrass beds, intertidal mudflats and inland freshwater riverine forest, the site is one of the best examples of a lowland tropical river basin, and supports a rich and unique biodiversity.

It is home to a rare Peninsular Malaysian endemic mangrove, Avicennia lanata and supports a number of globally threatened animals such as the flat-headed cat (Prionailurus planiceps) and smooth otter (Lutrogale perspicillata). Relatively undisturbed parts of the site, including the nipah (Nypa fructicans) lined banks may be nesting sites of the estuarine crocodile (Crocodylus porosus).

The site also supports an indigenous local population from the Orang Seletar tribe, who occupy the Kampung Simpang Arang fishing village situated within the mangroves. The villagers depend on the estuary, which support a significant proportion of commercial fishes, for their livelihoods. Unfortunately, the site sits within the Iskandar economic growth region, and faces high development pressure.

Recently, around 2,000-acres of mangroves at the southeastern section of the Ramsar site made way for a golf resort, which includes three 18-hole golf courses, a luxury hotel and low-density residential properties.

Ramsar site number: 1289
Ramsar site area: 526 ha
Ramsar site designation date: 31-01-2003
Legal designation:
1) Tanjung Piai Forest Reserve
2) Tanjung Piai (Johor) National Park

Justification for Ramsar site listing:

Criterion 2:
Supports vulnerable, endangered, or critically endangered species or threatened ecological communities.

Criterion 8:
An important source of food for fishes, spawning ground, nursery and/or migration path on which fish stocks, either within the wetland or elsewhere, depend.

Site summary
Tanjung Piai Ramsar Site consists of coastal mangroves and intertidal mudflats that fringe the southernmost tip of mainland Asia. The mangroves play a crucial role in protecting adjacent human settlements from coastal erosion, flooding and seawater intrusion.

Tanjung Piai supports threatened and vulnerable wetland-dependent species such as the Mangrove Pitta, Mangrove Blue Flycatcher and Mangrove Whistler, as well as the globally threatened Lesser Adjutant. The four rivers that run through the site hold an abundance of commercially-valuable fish species.

The site is an important tourism and CEPA destination. Facilities here include a visitor centre, hall, boardwalks, jetties, audio-visual gallery and a unique campsite within the mangrove forest. World Wetlands Day celebrations have been held here since 2003. Due to high sea traffic, the site has been affected by oil spills and coastal erosion, resulting in the loss of some of its mangrove forest.

However, significant effort and resources has been given towards protecting the site from further erosion, and restoring the mangroves that were previously lost.

Johor National Park Malaysia

CONTACT US

Johor National Parks Corporation
Tel: +607-266 1301 | Fax: +607-266 1302
Email: jnpc@johor.gov.my

Taman Negara Johor Tanjung Piai
82030, Mukim Serkat Pontian,
Johor Darul Ta’zim.
1.268202,103.509551
+607 696 9712
jnpc@johor.gov.my

Taman Laut Sultan lskandar
1-1, Jalan Abu Bakar,
86800 Mersing,
Johor Darul Ta’zim.
2.432211, 103.838622
+607 798 2868
jnpc@johor.gov.my

Pejabat Tapak Ramsar
Aras 1, Bangunan Dato’ Mohammad Salleh Perang,
Kota Iskandar,
79100 Nusajaya.
1.420026, 103.649722
+607 266 1301
jnpc@johor.gov.my

Contact Us

Taman Negara Johor Endau-Rompin (Peta)
11, Jalan Bawal 1,
Taman Kahang Baru,
86700 Kahang, Kluang,
Johor Darul Ta’zim.
2.21184,103.53768
+607 788 2812
jnpc@johor.gov.my

Taman Negara Johor Endau-Rompin (Selai)
8, Jalan Satria 1, Taman Berjaya, 86500 Bekok, Segamat, Johor Darul Ta’zim.

2.424895,103.283175
+607 922 2875
jnpc@johor.gov.my

Taman Negara Johor Gunung Ledang
P.O. Box 77, Batu 26, Jalan Segamat,
84020 Sagil, Ledang, Johor Darul Ta’zim.
2.20509,102.37034
+606 963 1030 / +019 777 2057
jnpc@johor.gov.my

Taman Negara Johor Pulau Kukup
Lot 1319, Mukim Air Masin,
82300 Kukup, Pontian,
Johor Darul Ta’zim.
1.326111,103.444167
+607 696 9355
jnpc@johor.gov.my

 

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